Nutritional ketosis has been proposed as a mechanism through which hunger may be suppressed. A recent meta-analysis investigated the impact of diet on appetite and shed some light on this possible phenomenon (11). The meta-analysis included 12 studies which investigated the effect of either a very low energy diet (VLED: defined as <800 calories per day) or ketogenic low-carbohydrate diet (KLCD: defined as CHO consumption of <10% of energy or <50 g/day, but ad libitum consumption of total energy, protein and fat). Interventions ranged from 4 – 12 weeks and weight loss was from 5.0 to 12.5 kg. In all studies nutritional ketosis was confirmed in VLED and KLCD via circulating levels of β-hydroxybutyrate. Interestingly, both groups reported decreases in appetite. The results of this meta-analysis are noteworthy in two regards. The VLED groups were clearly and significantly hypocaloric, suggesting a state in which hunger should be increased, not decreased. Similarly, the KLCD groups experienced simultaneous reductions in weight and appetite, while eating an ad libitum diet. The results of this meta-analysis provide support for the theory that nutritional ketosis may exert an appetite suppressing effect.
The ketogenic diet has recently become very popular, and many food companies want to cash in by putting a “ketogenic” or “low carb” label on a new product. Be very cautious of special “keto” or “low-carb” products, such as pastas, chocolate bars, energy bars, protein powders, snack foods, cakes, cookies and other “low carb” or “ketogenic” treats. Read all labels carefully for natural low carb ingredients. The fewer ingredients the better. 

Children who discontinue the diet after achieving seizure freedom have about a 20% risk of seizures returning. The length of time until recurrence is highly variable, but averages two years. This risk of recurrence compares with 10% for resective surgery (where part of the brain is removed) and 30–50% for anticonvulsant therapy. Of those who have a recurrence, just over half can regain freedom from seizures either with anticonvulsants or by returning to the ketogenic diet. Recurrence is more likely if, despite seizure freedom, an electroencephalogram shows epileptiform spikes, which indicate epileptic activity in the brain but are below the level that will cause a seizure. Recurrence is also likely if an MRI scan shows focal abnormalities (for example, as in children with tuberous sclerosis). Such children may remain on the diet longer than average, and children with tuberous sclerosis who achieve seizure freedom could remain on the ketogenic diet indefinitely.[46]

Protein can turn into carbohydrates via a metabolic process called gluconeogenesis (making new carbs) and will do in people at varying degrees. Protein turning into carbohydrates means you’re not in ketosis. However, this is generally an overblown statement that only happens at the extreme cases when you are drinking a lot of liquid protein shakes. 


I’m just starting this today. My intent is to be keto, but at the very least low carb. The biggest obstacle is that I’m vegetarian, so I have to eliminate the meat section. I plan on continuing with limited cheese and will look at tofu options. But my question is actually about olives! I understand they are low carb, but I buy in bulk and so there is no label to refer to. Is there a standard of net carbs you can advise for large green olives (stuffed with pimento) and Kalamata olives (for greek salads). thanks! Lois

After increasing water intake and replacing electrolytes, it should relieve most all symptoms of Keto Flu. For an average person that is starting a ketogenic diet, eating 20-30g of net carbs a day, the entire adaptation process will take about 4-5 days. My advice is to cut your carbs to fewer than 15g to ensure that you are well on your way into ketosis within one week. If you are experiencing any more keto flu symptoms, double check your electrolyte intake and adjust.


These tasty mini burgers are perfect for parties because they can feed your low carb AND carb-loving guests and no one will even miss that bread. Make them for tailgating parties, game day parties, summer picnics, or just a fun weeknight dinner for the family. Once you dip those little burger bites in that special sauce you’re going to be going back for seconds!
Made these donuts this morning, and they are delicious. The simplest and one of the best low carb donut recipes that I have tried. I did add a scoop of whey protein powder for structure, and that worked great. I used Swerve in the donuts and a small amount of Truvia (which contains a little sugar–but okay in this tiny amount per donut) for the topping. I got 8 donuts out of the recipe, but I think I actually could’ve gotten 10. I have two 6-cavity nonstick Wilton donut pans like the ones pictured in your link. Great recipe, Maya. Thanks!

Instead of making your own cereal, you can always have a low-carb alternative. Try out chia seed pudding, flax granola sprinkled into coconut or almond milk, salted caramel pork rind cereal, or just mix together toasted nuts that are crushed and crispy. It’s quite easy to find a crunchy alternative to cereal (or just a low-carb replacement in general) so keep on the lookout and experiment for yourself to see which you like best.


Personally, we like to use individual flours and combinations of flours instead of pre-made mixes like Carbquick. For example Carbquicks ingredients are: CarbaloseTM flour (enzyme enriched wheat, vital wheat gluten, wheat fiber, high-protein patent wheat flour, soy fiber, canola oil, salt, emulsifiers, enzymes, ascorbic acid, calcium propionate), palm and palm-kernel oil, buttermilk powder, baking powder, egg white powder, lecithin, salt, natural flavors.


I thought that eating this amount of protein would leave me a withered and emaciated little boy, but this is a belief I held for years of being beating over the head with jugs of protein powder and bro-science. It turns out, you (or, at least I) don’t need as much protein as once thought. However, eating very FEW grams of protein is not smart either. 
The ketogenic diet is indicated as an adjunctive (additional) treatment in children and young people with drug-resistant epilepsy.[26][27] It is approved by national clinical guidelines in Scotland,[27] England, and Wales[26] and reimbursed by nearly all US insurance companies.[28] Children with a focal lesion (a single point of brain abnormality causing the epilepsy) who would make suitable candidates for surgery are more likely to become seizure-free with surgery than with the ketogenic diet.[9][29] About a third of epilepsy centres that offer the ketogenic diet also offer a dietary therapy to adults. Some clinicians consider the two less restrictive dietary variants—the low glycaemic index treatment and the modified Atkins diet—to be more appropriate for adolescents and adults.[9] A liquid form of the ketogenic diet is particularly easy to prepare for, and well tolerated by, infants on formula and children who are tube-fed.[5][30]
Hi Barb, That can definitely be it. Losing when you are close to goal can be more difficult. It could also be that your body’s healthy weight is a little higher than what you’d like – which doesn’t mean you can’t lose, but makes it more difficult. If just eating Keto foods isn’t working, double check the macros for your weight and see if the amount you’re eating needs to be adjusted. You’ll find more help and support in our support group here.
Regrettably I was one of those who couldn’t get the recipe to work. My baking sheets weren’t perfectly flat so it was a real mess, the batter separated on the silpat and I couldn’t get the thing to set. This morning I had an idea and it worked perfectly- I cooked the batter in a non-stick frying pan with a kiss of EVOO like a crepe! Worked like a charm. Made your alfredo sauce with some chopped spinach, simmered the noodles in the sauce a few minutes and served it with a crispy pork roast. What a treat! Thank you so much, I’ll use this recipe again and again.
I made this today and the flavor is outstanding! My only thing about it I’m not completely thrilled with is the lack of clumps of nuts and seeds. I put some pecan pieces in hoping they would form some clumps with the nuts, but it didn’t really help. I’m wondering if a thicker liquid would make a difference. Perhaps Sukrin gold syrup instead of coconut oil and sweetener? Could maybe add some maple flavoring to it. You might not be able to find Sukrin in the UK, but it is accessible through Amazon. Would maybe some of your followers from the US have an opinion about this?
Health's contributing nutrition editor Cynthia Sass, RD, MPH, suggests looking for cereals that are made with nuts, seeds, coconut, a little bit of fruit, natural sweetener (think honey or agave syrup) instead of added sugar, and spices for flavor. Although many of these cereals may be gluten- or grain-free, you can also look for flaked whole grain varieties.
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