Fat: Most of the calories in a ketogenic diet come from fat, which is used for energy. The exact amount of fat a person needs to eat will depend on carbohydrate and protein intake, how many calories they use during the day, and whether they are losing weight (using their body fat for energy). Depending on these factors, somewhere in the range of 60 to 80 percent of calories will come from fats on a ketogenic diet (even up to 90 percent on, for example, the Ketogenic Diet for Epilepsy). People tend not to overeat on diets this high in fat, so calorie counting is rarely necessary.
Protein can turn into carbohydrates via a metabolic process called gluconeogenesis (making new carbs) and will do in people at varying degrees. Protein turning into carbohydrates means you’re not in ketosis. However, this is generally an overblown statement that only happens at the extreme cases when you are drinking a lot of liquid protein shakes. 

Rev, We are thrilled to tell you that we have a bread book coming out in September that has a ton of great keto bread recipes! Here are the links if you want to take a look: Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Keto-Bread-Muffins-Low-Carb-Keto-Friendly/dp/1507210906/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1549287717&sr=8-1&keywords=9781507210901 and Barnes and Noble link is now available here: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/books/1130507963?ean=9781507210901
Wondering what fits into a keto diet — and what doesn’t? “It’s so important to know what foods you’ll be eating before you start, and how to incorporate more fats into your diet,” says Kristen Mancinelli, RD, author of The Ketogenic Diet: A Scientifically Proven Approach to Fast, Healthy Weight Loss, who is based in New York City. We asked her for some guidelines.
Moreover, two recent meta-analyses sought to investigate the effect of LCD on weight loss and cardiovascular disease risk. Sackner-Bernstein et al. (19) compared LCD to LF, among overweight and obese men and women. The authors found a significantly greater effect of weight loss in the LCD vs. the LF diets (-8.2 kg vs. -5.9 kg). The impact of diet on cardiovascular risk factors was split, with LCD resulting in significantly greater improvements in HDL cholesterol and triglycerides, while the LF resulted in significantly greater improvements in LDL and total cholesterol. From this the authors concluded that LCD were a viable alternative to LF diets and recommended “dietary recommendations for weight loss should be revisited to consider this additional evidence of the benefits of [low] CHO diets.” A significant limitation of this meta-analysis, however, was the authors’ definition of low-carbohydrate as a daily CHO consumption less than 120 grams. This value, while well below the standard recommendation of daily CHO consumption, still far exceeds the strict recommendation of KD (≤50 g/day), therefore the results of this meta-analysis must be approached with caution.
All cold cereals are going to have some carbs in them. The key is to avoid simple carbohydrates, such as those found in processed grains like corn flakes or any old-school cereal made with refined white flour and a ton of sugar. The health organization Diabetes UK recommends choosing a cereal based on whole wheat, oats or bran. In addition to eating whole grain cereals, you also need to avoid excess added sugar such as high fructose corn syrup. The Center for Young Women's Health suggests that you choose a cereal that contains fewer than 8 grams of sugar per serving. Dried fruit counts as added sugar, so pay attention to the ingredient list. You can always purchase unsweetened cereal and add fresh fruit as a sweetener, because the vitamins, minerals and antioxidant benefits of fresh fruit outweigh the natural sugars.
Christopher D. Gardner, PhD; Alexandre Kiazand, MD; Sofiya Alhassan, PhD; Soowon Kim, PhD; Randall S. Stafford, MD, PhD; Raymond R. Balise, PhD; Helena C. Kraemer, PhD; Abby C. King, PhD, “Comparison of the Atkins, Zone, Ornish, and LEARN Diets for Change in Weight and Related Risk Factors Among Overweight Premenopausal Women,” JAMA. 2007;297(9):969-977. http://jama.jamanetwork.com/art icle.aspx?articleid=205916.

2. Raygan, F., Bahmani, F., Kouchaki, E., Aghadavod, E., Sharifi, S., Akbari, E., . . . Asemi, Z. (2016). Comparative effects of carbohydrate versus fat restriction on metabolic profiles, biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in overweight patients with Type 2 diabetic and coronary heart disease: A randomized clinical trial. PMID: 28607566 
Hi Brenda, I’m a fan! I love what you do! Pictures look great! I’m 61 Keto for 14 months and 60 lbs off! 10 more to go. I eat at TDEE to loose it works for me. I’m 5’8” 1900 calories 20 total carbs 50 protein and 182 fat. Copious amounts of fat! I speed walk. I live too far a gym to go. Rural MS! Blessings on your journey. Thank you for all you do!
Hi Mona, While I can’t offer medical advice, I definitely think this bread is better for you than regular white or wheat bread. But, 5-6 pieces a day might be pretty high in calories and displace other nutrients as a result. I usually recommend focusing on a diet of whole foods, especially vegetables, eggs, meat, and healthy fats, with smaller amounts coming from nuts, nut flours, dairy and fruit. Of course each person’s needs are different and your doctor would know better than me what is best for you.
My point here is that the warnings about the ketogenic principles are well taken and well documented. My concern is implications that this is a fad. I don’t use the word diet with my patients and I’m concerned that the principles behind the label and the real results that these readers have commented on might get minimized. I have found it best to encourage patients to read authors like: Stephen Phinney, Jeff Volek, Patricia Daly, and Charles Gant and the be partners with their doctors and check blood work as they move along. I am not for or against the article. If ketogenic principles offer people enduring, satisfying, and cohesive change then why not read about its potential and flexilbity?

Short-term results for the LGIT indicate that at one month approximately half of the patients experience a greater than 50% reduction in seizure frequency, with overall figures approaching that of the ketogenic diet. The data (coming from one centre's experience with 76 children up to the year 2009) also indicate fewer side effects than the ketogenic diet and that it is better tolerated, with more palatable meals.[18][50]
The ketogenic diet, or keto, relies on using your fat as fuel, instead of glucose from carbohydrates or protein. Simply put, the daily ketogenic diet consists of 75 percent fat, 20 percent of protein, and a teeny allotment of carbohydrates, about 5 percent. This balance of macronutrients is intended to put your body in a state of ketosis, which suppresses the release of insulin and blood glucose levels. The benefits of ketosis to your health are improvements in biomarkers like blood glucose, reduction of blood pressure and decreased appetite due to fullness linked to consumption of fats.
The modified Atkins diet reduces seizure frequency by more than 50% in 43% of patients who try it and by more than 90% in 27% of patients.[18] Few adverse effects have been reported, though cholesterol is increased and the diet has not been studied long term.[48] Although based on a smaller data set (126 adults and children from 11 studies over five centres), these results from 2009 compare favourably with the traditional ketogenic diet.[18]
If you want something that feels a little more indulgent, you can recreate gnocchi with just two ingredients: egg yolk and shredded mozzarella. In fact, as the Primitive Palate discovered when creating the recipe, while it’s a little more time consuming (you’ll need about a half hour from start to finish) making gnocchi this way is considerably easier than the traditional method.
Basically, carbohydrates are the primary source of energy production in body tissues. When the body is deprived of carbohydrates due to reducing intake to less than 50g per day, insulin secretion is significantly reduced and the body enters a catabolic state. Glycogen stores deplete, forcing the body to go through certain metabolic changes. Two metabolic processes come into action when there is low carbohydrate availability in body tissues: gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis.

The ketogenic diet is indicated as an adjunctive (additional) treatment in children and young people with drug-resistant epilepsy.[26][27] It is approved by national clinical guidelines in Scotland,[27] England, and Wales[26] and reimbursed by nearly all US insurance companies.[28] Children with a focal lesion (a single point of brain abnormality causing the epilepsy) who would make suitable candidates for surgery are more likely to become seizure-free with surgery than with the ketogenic diet.[9][29] About a third of epilepsy centres that offer the ketogenic diet also offer a dietary therapy to adults. Some clinicians consider the two less restrictive dietary variants—the low glycaemic index treatment and the modified Atkins diet—to be more appropriate for adolescents and adults.[9] A liquid form of the ketogenic diet is particularly easy to prepare for, and well tolerated by, infants on formula and children who are tube-fed.[5][30]

Made these donuts this morning, and they are delicious. The simplest and one of the best low carb donut recipes that I have tried. I did add a scoop of whey protein powder for structure, and that worked great. I used Swerve in the donuts and a small amount of Truvia (which contains a little sugar–but okay in this tiny amount per donut) for the topping. I got 8 donuts out of the recipe, but I think I actually could’ve gotten 10. I have two 6-cavity nonstick Wilton donut pans like the ones pictured in your link. Great recipe, Maya. Thanks!
In many developing countries, the ketogenic diet is expensive because dairy fats and meat are more expensive than grain, fruit and vegetables. The modified Atkins diet has been proposed as a lower-cost alternative for those countries; the slightly more expensive food bill can be offset by a reduction in pharmaceutical costs if the diet is successful. The modified Atkins diet is less complex to explain and prepare and requires less support from a dietitian.[55]
Another amazing recipe!! I made these this morning and they came out great. I baked for 28 minutes. Mine didn’t rise very much, I used brand new baking powder but I must have measured something incorrectly. I used your knife method when taking out of the pan and then turned my pans upside down and tapped them and the donuts fell right out. I also bought the pans you suggested. They were a huge hit. Thank you!!
You can grind almost any nut to obtain a flour-like consistency and use it to reduce the carb content of your recipes. Walnut meal, for example, can be used in many recipes that call for almond flour. Other nut flours that you can experiment with are hazelnut meal, pecan meal, macadamia nut meal, and pistachio meal. Each one will provide your baked goods with a unique flavor, so choose wisely.
One downside to a ketogenic diet for weight loss is the difficulty maintaining it. “Studies show that weight loss results from being on a low-carb diet for more than 12 months tend to be the same as being on a normal, healthy diet,” says Mattinson. While you may be eating more satiating fats (like peanut butter, regular butter, or avocado), you’re also way more limited in what’s allowed on the diet, which can make everyday situations, like eating dinner with family or going out with friends, far more difficult. Because people often find it tough to sustain, it’s easy to rely on it as a short-term diet rather than a long-term lifestyle.
Love your blog and recipes, thank you! Congratulations on doing keto – I’ve been sugar, dairy, grain and pretty much all carb free for over a year keeping my carbs to under 30 grams per day. My question is about coffee…did you give it up? I was drinking way too much coffee with heavy cream so I finally gave that up for Califia almond/coconut creamer sugar free of course! Did you give up coffee during the keto trial?
I have never made waffles with this mix as we don’t make waffles. However, I would think it would be similar to pancakes, which I have made. Did you use 1/4 cup of Xantham gum? More than this seems to make a pastier batter. When making pancakes, I found that I needed to batter to be way thicker than most pancake batters. I also found that I needed more eggs. As for what else this mix can be used for, I have recipes at the blog for cookies, cupcakes, biscuits, and crepes using this mix. I have dozens of recipes in various stages of testing that use this mix. Some of my favorites are quick breads and muffins and cookies. Cake type recipes (muffins, small loaves of bread, cupcakes, cake, etc.) really turn out well with this mix. Let me know how some other dishes turn out for you! Thanks!
I’d heard recommendations of using only egg whites with psyllium, but whole eggs are more convenient. Besides, egg yolks are a natural leavener, so including them, makes the bread rise better in combination with the baking powder. Fortunately, whole eggs worked! It turns out that my friend, Lisa from Low Carb Yum, used whole eggs in her coconut flour psyllium husk bread, too.

To replace 1 egg, mix 1 tbsp ground flax meal with 3 tbsp of water and allow it to swell. This can be used to replace the eggs but it will not give to properties that eggs do. Eggs help bind the ingredients, eggs help the baking become light, fluffy and rise. Eggs help emulsify the mixture. This formula is used in many vegan recipes or those who are allergic to eggs. If a recipe is heavily based on eggs, this substitution will not work.
I don’t know anyone doing keto with cardiac issues, but yes for diabetes. I’ve noticed though many doctors are not promoting keto at all and it’s disappointing to be honest. I hope you’ll find out what works for you or at least your doctor will research it before saying it isn’t a good idea. Anyway, sound advice can be found from Jimmy Moore who has been doing keto for years and years and his website and podcasts are full of interviews with doctors. He’d probably be the best source of info for your condition. Best of luck to you!
One of the most powerful tools available to individuals on the ketogenic diet is fasting. Caloric restriction forces the body to burn through all of its available carbohydrates. Therefore fasting serves as an excellent kick start for getting the body into ketosis. Furthermore, periodic fasting while the body is in ketosis helps maintain that state because it keeps carbohydrate levels in the body negligible. Not to mention, fasting has been practiced by many cultures for thousands of years, and has numerous health benefits, generally, and is an incredibly powerful tool for improving brain health, specifically.
Because I don’t think it does work as well. If you use it that way and you like it great but I can’t recommend it because I didn’t like the texture the times that I tried it in this recipe. Each recipe is tested several times… usually by several people… and this one everyone who tried it liked the original better than the xanthan gum. SO… now you know why I keep saying there’s no substitute. 🙂
Health's contributing nutrition editor Cynthia Sass, RD, MPH, suggests looking for cereals that are made with nuts, seeds, coconut, a little bit of fruit, natural sweetener (think honey or agave syrup) instead of added sugar, and spices for flavor. Although many of these cereals may be gluten- or grain-free, you can also look for flaked whole grain varieties.
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