You can make “quick breads”–or non-yeast breads with it. It does not have enough gluten to make dough rise well. If you see a bread that calls for almond flour or coconut flour (to a certain extent–coconut flour usually requires more eggs), you can often substitute this mix for a lower fat, lower calorie, more diverse-tasting flour. If you are after yeast products, I recommend my Low Carb Sprouted Flour Mix. (Bread and yeast product recipes for that mix are coming soon!)
Still, whole wheat flour comes in about midway on our list of flours based on carbohydrate content, so it’s got a little less than 45 carbohydrates per half cup, and comes in mid-range for GI at 69, You may find that you want to sneak whole wheat flour into your recipes, by adding a little at a time and working up to where you have mostly whole-wheat bread.
Y. Wady Aude, MD; Arthur S. Agatston, MD; Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, MD, MSc; Eric H. Lieberman, MD; Marie Almon, MS, RD; Melinda Hansen, ARNP; Gerardo Rojas, MD; Gervasio A. Lamas, MD; Charles H. Hennekens, MD, DrPH, “The National Cholesterol Education Program Diet vs a Diet Lower in Carbohydrates and Higher in Protein and Monounsaturated Fat,” Arch Intern Med. 2004;164(19):2141-2146. http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=217514.
I too have been following you for a long time, trying your recipes and loving most of them. I am 4 days into the keto diet. I have not looked at the scale yet, but I kinda feel like my clothes fit a bit better. I am not in ketosis though…I was glad to hear that it took you a bit longer to get there so I don’t feel like I am doing it wrong. I am 62 and 5 foot 2 and I just can’t seem to keep my protein low enough. Too much meat I am guessing. I am trying to stay at 1330 calories, 105 grams of fat, 20 carbs, and 76 protein. I am very interested in learning what you eat in your typical meals for the day. I use the free version of My fitness pal.
I tried to make the egg noodles and it was a total failure. Followed the directions without any substitutions.’ Not sure what happened. The texture was off. It was nearly impossible to remove from the pan and I used the latex mat and sprayed as well. It was mushy and seemed undercooked. I was disappointed because I had made the sauce and was ready to eat. It looked like the mixture was set and cooked, Perhaps my oven is off.
I have been reading all the above comments about the gluten verse other ingredients. As a pastry chef, the information that has been missing here is that not only is gluten a protein, it is also the “elastic” that holds the pasta together. 80% of the proteins in flour are called glutenin and gladin. When combined with liquid, they form the elastic substance called gluten.
Weight loss is the primary reason my patients use the ketogenic diet. Previous research shows good evidence of a faster weight loss when patients go on a ketogenic or very low carbohydrate diet compared to participants on a more traditional low-fat diet, or even a Mediterranean diet. However, that difference in weight loss seems to disappear over time.
I haven’t had great success converting chocolate chip cookie recipes. I think it’s because my expectations are for the cookies to taste like my daughter’s perfect, sugary-white=flour-amazing ones. And it just doesn’t happen. I do have my peanut butter cookie recipes up, and I put chocolate chips in those sometimes. Back to your question with the coconut flour. I expected to have to tweak recipes a lot more for the small amount of coconut flour in this mix, but it hasn’t been the case. Sometimes I add a little extra almond milk, but I haven’t had to increase the eggs like I thought I would have to. That said, I would start with your regular amounts and play with the dough and see. Another egg might be needed. I will be surprised if you get the original crispy/chewy texture, but please let me know if you do!!! 🙂

There are several different types of flour made from seeds. Flaxseed meal is an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids and can be used in muffins, pancakes and other baked goods as an oil or butter substitute. A 1/4-cup serving has 8 grams of carbohydrates. Although more difficult to find, sunflower seed flour is very low in carbohydrates with less than 6 grams per 1/4 cup.
In essence, it is a diet that causes the body to release ketones into the bloodstream. Most cells prefer to use blood sugar, which comes from carbohydrates, as the body’s main source of energy. In the absence of circulating blood sugar from food, we start breaking down stored fat into molecules called ketone bodies (the process is called ketosis). Once you reach ketosis, most cells will use ketone bodies to generate energy until we start eating carbohydrates again. The shift, from using circulating glucose to breaking down stored fat as a source of energy, usually happens over two to four days of eating fewer than 20 to 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. Keep in mind that this is a highly individualized process, and some people need a more restricted diet to start producing enough ketones.
Shirataki noodles are available in many shapes -- spaghetti, fettucini, macaroni -- and can be purchased plain. Products like Miracle Noodle and NoOodle Noodles sell this type, which tends to be extra-slippery, nutritionally void (they are mostly made up of water) and close to calorie-free. Other brands, like House Foods and Nasoya's Pasta Zero blend the yam flour with tofu or chickpeas, which adds just a few calories and grams of carbohydrates and fiber.
But I just made some biscuits from an old cooking book, which had Almonds grounded (so I just used my almond flour) & I switched sugar for some xylitol & then thought I’d use the Coconut flour in place of ordinary Plain Flour! I did it cup for cup, so it was 2/3 cup……remembered about needing more liquid, so I added an egg (receipt already had 150g butter, which I put in 160g) They taste nice, but I think maybe I should have reduced the coconut flour, after reading your points, or added another egg, or more butter, what would you do? They also have an almond on top. thanks, Pam
Brenda, here is the link to the article. From what I have been reading the diarrhea is not uncommon. I had been using KCT oil in my coffee and smoothies, that compounded the problem. I have tried several of the suggestions this article suggested and it has been a great help. My wife and I were wondering what fat sources are you using. We have been trying to get more fat into our diets. We do use butter, sour cream, full fat dairy products, and changed our hamburger meat back to 85-15, most of the time. Super love your articles, they show you care. That is what is missing in today’s world.
I wasn't sure how this pasta would taste, but I was pleasantly surprised. I am a type 2 diabetic and I can always use more options for pasta that helps keep my blood sugar under control. Only problem I had was that it took a lot longer than the 3 minutes the package stated to cook it. On the whole, I am satisfied. I include a photo of my Garlic Shrimp with Fettuccine I made with the pasta.
So glad to hear that I’m not the only one that’s not dropping pounds/inches like gangbusters…I’ve been “pretty” low carb/keto, lift twice a week and cardio 3 other days and nothing…nothing happens. I’d like to lose 10-15 pounds and just can’t seem to get anywhere…55…post menopausal. I’d say that my carbs are generally around 30 per day or less and I do IF. Love to hear your thoughts.
This is a good low carb substitute for regular flour. I made pizza dough first using my regular (almost) recipe with a little added flaxseed flour to decrease the carbs more; ugh, not good. I am not a health nut. Then I used straight Carbalose with two times as much dry yeast, a packet of stevia, salt and water. I let it proof for ab out 15 minutes then added more Carbalose until the moisture and flour combination felt right. I let it mix in my mixer a few minutes and let it sit until it bulked up by about 1/3 (Watch it carefully, after a while it deflates.). Patted it out to the thickness I wanted, topped it, and put it on a 500 degree pizza stone. Success ! Almost as good as regular flour. Simple but good. Next ... full review

The Johns Hopkins Hospital protocol for initiating the ketogenic diet has been widely adopted.[43] It involves a consultation with the patient and their caregivers and, later, a short hospital admission.[19] Because of the risk of complications during ketogenic diet initiation, most centres begin the diet under close medical supervision in the hospital.[9]
Almond flour recipes typically require more eggs and more leavening agent to help them rise properly. I also like to add a little dry protein, like whey protein powder, as I find this can help [with rising?].  Almond flour recipes may also contain less oil and liquid as well, to account for the high fat content of the nuts. In my experience, low carb, gluten-free batters are thicker than their conventional counterparts. Resist the urge to thin them out, as you may end up with a soggy mess.
I’m afraid there won’t be a straight substitution ratio because they behave a little differently. Not as different as coconut flour vs almond flour, but flaxseed nonetheless will have a different protein/fat/water ratio so will act in cakes and baking in a unique way. Saying that I love experimenting. I would begin by using a lower amount of the flaxseed to whichever recipe you decide to try, then mix and see what the result is. It may be that you need some extra liquid, an extra egg or a little more flaxseed. Sorry, that’s probably not the easy answer, but in the long run, if you get to really know how these new flours world – bam – you’re away!
Cereal is a tough one to give up when starting a low carb, grain-free or paleo diet. It’s easy to make, it’s tasty and it fills you up. For a little bit, anyway, before the subsequent blood sugar crash. But it turns out that you don’t have to give it up at all, as long as you are willing to make your own. And many of these low carb cereal recipes are almost as easy to make as grabbing the box from your cupboard and pouring cereal into your bowl. From granola to squares to hot cereals for a cold winter morning, we’ve got you covered.
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