Nutritional ketosis has been proposed as a mechanism through which hunger may be suppressed. A recent meta-analysis investigated the impact of diet on appetite and shed some light on this possible phenomenon (11). The meta-analysis included 12 studies which investigated the effect of either a very low energy diet (VLED: defined as <800 calories per day) or ketogenic low-carbohydrate diet (KLCD: defined as CHO consumption of <10% of energy or <50 g/day, but ad libitum consumption of total energy, protein and fat). Interventions ranged from 4 – 12 weeks and weight loss was from 5.0 to 12.5 kg. In all studies nutritional ketosis was confirmed in VLED and KLCD via circulating levels of β-hydroxybutyrate. Interestingly, both groups reported decreases in appetite. The results of this meta-analysis are noteworthy in two regards. The VLED groups were clearly and significantly hypocaloric, suggesting a state in which hunger should be increased, not decreased. Similarly, the KLCD groups experienced simultaneous reductions in weight and appetite, while eating an ad libitum diet. The results of this meta-analysis provide support for the theory that nutritional ketosis may exert an appetite suppressing effect.
Hi, I’m still a bit skeptical, I have seen some of my friends do the keto diet, and have had good results. Though I am still not sure about the idea of the fats being eaten. They say they eat meat with the fat and must do so, is this correct? Also isn’t this not good for the body especially for the kidneys? Second, can a diabetic do this diet? There are many questions running through my head.
There is nothing inherently difficult about following a ketogenic diet. We have many patients who do this very easily over many years. The metabolic benefits significantly outway any perceived challenges from limiting particular food types. Uptake would be far more widespread if nutrition professionals left their predujical opinions of SFA’s behind. Finally, given the expertise in Ketogenic Diets at Harvard, Dr David Ludwig, for one springs to mind, I am surprised the author did not avail themselves of the local expertise.
Family Friendly (FF): Again, to make this more Family-Friendly—or to just create a healthier baking mix for your family that is not reliant on processed or over-consumed white flour and other grains, you can do a couple of things: (1) Make this as it is listed and use it half and half with oat flour, quinoa flour, sprouted wheat, or other higher-carb flours that bake up more like regular grains; (2) Make this almost as it is given but use a higher carb flour for any of the really low ones. For example, if you use Bob’s Red Mill Oat Flour or sprouted white wheat flour for some of the flours, you can still end up with a forty-carb-per-cup mix that is healthy as opposed to a one-hundred-carb-per-cup grain (white or wheat flour) that is less healthy. Family-Friendly Low Carbing is a very healthy approach to baking! (3) Make this as is and use it combined with my Sprouted Flour Mix as needed to “dilute” the tastes.
Katie, Almond flour is probably the easiest keto-friendly flour for a new cook to work with. It’s very versatile and can be used in recipes for cookies, muffins, breads, scones, cakes, etc. (Of course the ratio of almond flour to other ingredients changes based on what you’re making.) But with that being said, because almond flour doesn’t have gluten, it can be difficult to simulate the soft crumb of regular baked goods unless you combine almond flour with another keto-friendly flour and/or a binding agent. This is why a lot of our recipes call for more than one type of flour. I hope this helps! If you’re looking for a certain recipe in particular please let us know and we’ll try to point you in the right direction!
I’ve been seeing a lot of recipes on pinterest that use peanut flour (not touted as low-carb necessarily)…was wondering if it would be good for baking keto recipes. There are carbs in it but if you bake something and only eat a serving, I’m thinking it might not be too carby. Not sure how it does as a sub for other flours that others use for keto recipes.
Non-GMO low-carb pastas are a good option if you're concerned about the potential effects on your health of consuming genetically altered ingredients. Though there are competing views in the scientific community with regard to the long-term safety of regular GMO consumption, many choose to eat only non-GMO products as an extra-cautious measure. Similarly, organic low-carb pastas that include ingredients that haven't been treated with or exposed to chemicals are easy to find.
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