So let’s talk about vital wheat gluten. Yes, it is wheat, and yes in high amounts it has carbs – although not as many as flour. In this tiny amount it adds no carbs to the recipe yet helps the noodles to not only hold together but also to have that tender chewy texture we all love. This should NOT be served to anyone with a gluten intolerance or allergy but it’s just fine for low carb lifestyles.
Similar to the recommendations I make in Grain Brain, a ketogenic diet should derive a majority of its calories from fat. However, the optimal macronutrient ratio will vary from person to person. Some will thrive on roughly 80% of calories from healthy fats and 20% from carbohydrates and protein. Others may do better in the range of 60 – 75% of calories from fat and slightly more protein. I encourage you to experiment to find what works best for you. To meet this goal, you must consume plentiful amounts of healthy plant and animal fats. Some good examples of healthy fats include:
Well from what I’ve learned and of course there is conflicting info, no one is really an expert and every person is different, but I lose the bullet proof coffee but I’d rather “eat” my fat amount later in the day I guess. Like in the form of a sweet fat bomb or something. I’ve read that too much fat for where I’m at with just like 5 pounds to lose, I may not see the scale move because my body will only be burning the fat I’m eating. I’m still experimenting to see what works best for me. Right now I’m slowly losing and seeing results. I guess if the I stop seeing any results I will have to change things up. I will be sure to post about it.
If you are low carb and nut-free, coconut flour may be one of your best options for low carb and keto baking. Still, it’s not an easy flour to work with, especially if you are new to this low carb diet thing. So before you start, I suggest you read my primer on How to Bake with Coconut Flour. You can’t just sub in coconut flour for regular flour or for other low carb flours. It’s very dense and it requires an inordinate amount of eggs to bake properly, so direct substitutions will result in utter failure!
Despite “cereal” being often associated with “carbs,” these days there are plenty of low carb cereals available. Remember that milk has naturally occurring sugars, which are carbs, so be sparing in how much milk you put on your cereal if you want to cut even more carbs. You can also opt for hot cereals – plain oatmeal is actually one of the best whole grain, low carb choices out there – if you do not like plain cereal and milk. The five brands above provide particularly good options in their low carb counts along with high fiber and protein. Head to your nearest supermarket today to find some great low carb cereals!
While there are many almond-flour pastas advertised as low carb, be sure to triple-check the label. Many brands contain more carbohydrates than you’d believe. Al Dente Carba Nada contains over 24 grams of total carbohydrates, or 17 grams net carbs[*]. Fiber Gourmet, also advertised as low carb, contains over 40 grams of total carbohydrates per serving and 3 grams of sugar[*].

A ketogenic diet could be an interesting alternative to treat certain conditions, and may accelerate weight loss. But it is hard to follow and it can be heavy on red meat and other fatty, processed, and salty foods that are notoriously unhealthy. We also do not know much about its long-term effects, probably because it’s so hard to stick with that people can’t eat this way for a long time. It is also important to remember that “yo-yo diets” that lead to rapid weight loss fluctuation are associated with increased mortality. Instead of engaging in the next popular diet that would last only a few weeks to months (for most people that includes a ketogenic diet), try to embrace change that is sustainable over the long term. A balanced, unprocessed diet, rich in very colorful fruits and vegetables, lean meats, fish, whole grains, nuts, seeds, olive oil, and lots of water seems to have the best evidence for a long, healthier, vibrant life.
A standby snack for everyone from toddlers to seniors, plain Cheerios are a moderately low-carb choice, with 20 grams per cup. Kay’s Naturals cereals in three flavors -- French vanilla, honey almond and apple cinnamon -- have 18 to 19 grams per 1.2-ounce serving. They get their sweet flavors from honey, sugar and stevia. Another low-carb choice is the soy-based cereal, Smaps, in cocoa or sweet maple flavors, which contain monk fruit or low-glycemic fruit concentrate and 8 grams of carbs per ½-cup serving.
If you are facing a really busy day and don’t have time to cook eggs and bacon, you could rustle up this filling and delicious grain and gluten-free cereal to get the whole family off to a healthy start. It takes a few minutes to cook, then you can enjoy this warming bowlful either on its own or with some fresh berries for added fruitiness. Perfect for a busy family!
Urine ketone data were missing in a median of 4 participants (range 0–8) at any given visit. The proportion of participants with a urine ketone reading greater than trace was 1 of 17 participants at baseline, 5 of 17 participants at week 2, and similar frequencies at subsequent visits until week 14 when 2 of 18 participants had readings greater than trace and week 16 when 2 of 21 participants had readings greater than trace. During the study, only 27 of 151 urine ketone measurements were greater than trace, with one participant accounting for all 7 occurrences of the highest urine ketone reading (large160).
Long-term use of the ketogenic diet in children increases the risk of slowed or stunted growth, bone fractures, and kidney stones.[18] The diet reduces levels of insulin-like growth factor 1, which is important for childhood growth. Like many anticonvulsant drugs, the ketogenic diet has an adverse effect on bone health. Many factors may be involved such as acidosis and suppressed growth hormone.[38] About one in 20 children on the ketogenic diet develop kidney stones (compared with one in several thousand for the general population). A class of anticonvulsants known as carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (topiramate, zonisamide) are known to increase the risk of kidney stones, but the combination of these anticonvulsants and the ketogenic diet does not appear to elevate the risk above that of the diet alone.[39] The stones are treatable and do not justify discontinuation of the diet.[39] Johns Hopkins Hospital now gives oral potassium citrate supplements to all ketogenic diet patients, resulting in one-seventh of the incidence of kidney stones.[40] However, this empiric usage has not been tested in a prospective controlled trial.[9] Kidney stone formation (nephrolithiasis) is associated with the diet for four reasons:[39]
Hi Vivian – I am 60 yo and researching Keto and would love more information from you since we are same age. What is TDEE? What fat sources do you use and how much daily? What are some meals you make regularly and what does a day of food look like? What is the easiest/best way to count carbs getting started? If you and Brenda are ok with you giving me your email I would love to learn more from you! I just need some help getting started. Brenda – thank you for all your information and recipes! 
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